Vietnam

The best Pho Bo in Ho Chi Minh

During my short backpacking trip in Ho Chi Minh, I had the opportunity of eating one of the best Pho Bo, Vietnamese beef noodle soup in Ho Chi Minh. Pho is a common staple dish in the country with decades of history. Along the streets of Ho Chi Minh, you can easily find street vendors and restaurants selling Pho at almost every street corner. What makes a good Pho Bo? The dish may seem easy to make to some. I mean, it’s pretty difficult to overcook the flat rice noodles used to make Pho Bo unless you intentionally leave it in a pot of boiling water for a very long period of time. The skill in making an awesome Pho Bo, is in the broth and the beef. The broth has to be clear and flavourful. Made by simmering beef bones, onion, ginger and many other spices over long hours on.
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Banh Cuon (Steamed Rice Rolls)

As I was eating my Banh Cuon Thanh Tri, I noticed that the wife of the stallholder was making something else with the freshly made Banh Cuon. Banh Cuon (steamed rice rolls) is made from wide sheets of fermented rice batter made by pouring the batter over a piece of cloth which is stretched over a pot of boiling water and steamed to form. Once cooked, the delicate rice sheet is then transferred to a metal plate where it is cut into four pieces. Beside the metal plate is a big pot of filling consisting of seasoned ground pork, minced mushroom and minced shallots. A generous amount of filling is laid on the rice sheet and rolled into rice rolls. It looks a lot like Chee Cheong Fun, a Cantonese dish from Hong Kong. When finished, more beans sprouts and vegetables are added to the dish. Although the presentation looks similar to.
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Banh Cuon Thanh Tri (Vietnamese Rice Sheet Noodles)

After staying in Ho Chi Minh for the first few days, I realised that Vietnamese can eat rice noodles all day long. That means rice noodles for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Even on a hot day, they created a cold rice sheet noodle dish called Banh Cuon Thanh Tri (Vietnamese rice sheet noodles) that’s much easier to eat under the hot sun. Along the road before the junction of Ton That Tung and Bui Vien is this little stall that sells cheap Banh Cuon Thanh Tri. Stalls along the street usually don’t have signboards so you will have to do a little searching in order to find this stall. Look for the man with the blue cap and his wife with a traditional Vietnamese hat in the photo below. Banh Cuon Thanh Tri can be prepared within minutes upon ordering because all the ingredients have already been cooked beforehand and just needs.
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Kem Xôi Dừa – Coconut rice ice-cream

My friend Aldric wanted to introduce me to this dessert called Kem Xôi Dừa after dinner. He claimed that this is one of the must-have dessert in Ho Chi Minh. Together with other travel friends that I met in the hostel, we walked along Bùi Viện street to the food stall located along the street. The making of the dessert is fairly simple. Crack a young coconut into half Separate the coconut flesh from the walls of the coconut Add a large spoonful of sticky rice or glutinous rice Add a scoop of vanilla ice-cream Sprinkle roasted nuts and pumpkin bits Add a generous serving of Nata de coco Finish off with a layer of coconut cream Amy and I bought a Kem Xôi Dừa each and we enjoyed this dessert. We were also served a cup of fresh coconut water from the young coconut. This is definitely a must-have dessert. If you are walking.
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A quiet afternoon at the Ho Chi Minh Fine Arts Museum

Located near the Bến Thành Market, the Fine Arts Museum exhibits some of the greatest artworks created throughout the history of the Vietnam. There are also works from renowned foreign artists being exhibited. The museum is housed in an impressive colonial building with both Chinese and French influences. Both influences complement each other very well and are produce an architecture that’s very pleasing to the eye. Admissions into the Fine Arts Museum costs 10,000 VND and tickets can be purchased outside the museum. The interior of the building is just as impressive as the exterior. I love the simplicity and large space. There is also an antique lift (non-working) at the main staircase. Walking up the stairs, I noticed the well-restored French influenced windows and stair railings. On the second and third floors, vintage sliding gates are installed to lock portions of the floor, retaining the vintage look of the building. On.
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